Rocedure for Making a French Omelet

See Figure 24.6 for illustration of technique. Collect all equipment and ingredients.

Beat 2 or 3 eggs in a small bowl just until well mixed. Do not whip until frothy. Season with salt and pepper.

If desired, 1 tablespoon (15 mL) water may be added to make the omelet lighter.

For extended service, beat a large quantity of eggs. Measure each portion with a ladle.

Place an omelet pan over high heat.

When the pan is hot, add about 1 tablespoon (15 mL) clarified butter and swirl it around to coat the inside of the pan. Give it a second to get hot.

Raw butter may be used, but great care is necessary to keep it from burning.

Add the eggs to the pan. They should begin to coagulate around the edges and on the bottom in a few seconds.

With one hand (the left, if you are right-handed), vigorously shake the pan back and forth. At the same time, stir the eggs with a circular motion with the bottom side of a fork, but do not let the fork scrape the pan.

This is the difficult part. The most common errors are not shaking and stirring vigorously enough and using heat that is too low. The purpose of this action is to keep the eggs in motion so they coagulate uniformly. Stop shaking and stirring when the eggs are almost set but still very moist. If you continue stirring, you will have scrambled eggs instead of an omelet.

Tilt the handle up and shake the pan so the omelet slides to the opposite side of the pan and begins to climb up the opposite slope.

For a filled omelet, spoon the filling across the center of the egg, perpendicular to the handle. With the fork, fold the sides of the omelet over the center. The omelet should now be resting in the corner of the pan and have an approximately oval shape.

Grasp the handle of the pan with your palm underneath and tilt the omelet out onto a plate so it inverts and keeps an oval shape.

The whole procedure should take less than 1 minute.

The finished omelet should be moist on the inside, tender on the outside, and yellow or only slightly browned.

(e) Grasp the handle of the pan with your palm underneath and tilt the omelet onto a plate.

(f) The finished omelet should have a neat, oval shape. Some chefs prefer omelets that are lightly browned. Others feel that they should not be browned at all.

(d) Fold over the side of the omelet to make an oval shape.

(e) Grasp the handle of the pan with your palm underneath and tilt the omelet onto a plate.

(f) The finished omelet should have a neat, oval shape. Some chefs prefer omelets that are lightly browned. Others feel that they should not be browned at all.

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