Pan Gravies And Other Integral Sauces

An integral sauce is a sauce based on the juices released during the cooking of a meat, poultry, fish, or vegetable item. Most of the sauces we have discussed so far are not integral sauces.That is, they are made separately from and independently of the items they are served with. An integral sauce,on the other hand, can't be made separately, because it incorporates cooking juices from the item it is served with.

Basic Procedure for Making Pan Gravy

Method 2 has fewer steps, but Method 1 is actually quicker for large quantities and gives greater control over final consistency.

Method 1

1.

Remove the roast from the roasting pan.

If you have not added mirepoix to the pan during roasting, you can do so now.

2.

Clarify the fat.

Set the roasting pan over high heat and cook until all the moisture has evaporated, leaving only the fat, mirepoix, and the brown

(caramelized) drippings. Pour off and save the fat.

3.

Deglaze the pan.

Pour stock or other liquid into the roasting pan. Stir over heat until caramelized drippings are dissolved.

4.

Combine with stock and simmer.

Pour the deglazing liquid, plus mirepoix, into a large pot with desired amount of stock. Simmer until mirepoix is well cooked.

Skim the surface well to remove fat and scum.

5.

Make a roux or, alternatively, a slurry of arrowroot or cornstarch and water.

For roux, measure enough of the fat from step 2 to make the correct amount of roux for the volume of gravy. Make a blond or brown

roux, as desired. For starch slurry, see page 161.

B.

Thicken the gravy with the roux or starch slurry.

7.

Strain.

B.

Adjust seasonings.

Method 2

1.

Remove the roast from the roasting pan.

2.

Clarify the fat.

3.

Add flour to the roasting pan and make a roux.

4.

Add stock. Stir until thickened and the pan is deglazed.

5.

Strain. Skim excess fat.

B.

Adjust consistency, if necessary, with more stock or more roux.

7.

Season.

The most important technique required for integral sauces is deglazing (see pp. 72 and 167).Juices released by sautéed and roasted meats are reduced and caramelized in the bottom of the pan during cooking. Deglazing dissolves these caramelized juices and incorporates them into the desired sauce. For the simplest example, if you sauté a chicken breast and then deglaze the sauté pan with a little stock and season the resulting liquid, you end up with an integral sauce that can be served with the chicken.

The most basic and familiar integral sauces are pan gravy and jus. Pan gravy is a sauce made with juices or drippings of the meat or poultry with which it is being served. Standard pan gravies are similar to brown sauces. Instead of being made with espagnole or demi-glace as a base, however, they are made from pan drippings plus roux plus stock or water and, sometimes, milk or cream.

Jus (zhoo) refers to unthickened juices from a roast.When the roast is served with these clear, natural juices,it is said to be served au jus (oh zhoo),meaning "with juice." Stock is usually added to the pan juices to obtain enough quantity to serve.

The preparation of both pan gravy and jus are properly part of meat cookery, and recipes and detailed procedures are included in the meat and poultry chapters. Similarly, recipes for all integral sauces are included as part of the meat, fish, or vegetable in the appropriate chapters.

The principal recipes are on page 292 (Roast Beef Gravy) and page 370 (Roast Turkey with Giblet Gravy). Gravy-making is also incorporated in the recipes for Roast Stuffed Shoulder of Lamb (p. 294), Roast Loin of Pork with Sage and Apples (p. 293), and Roast Chicken with Natural Gravy (p. 368).

Now that you have studied sauce-making in detail, read the general procedure for making pan gravies on page 184 so you can see how similar it is to making brown sauce and how the same techniques you have just learned are applied to a different product.

Continue reading here: Modern Sauces

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