Octopus

Octopus (the name means "eight feet") range in size from less than an ounce to many pounds. All sizes are firm-textured, even chewy, but the larger sizes are usually considered too tough to eat. Because of its texture, octopus requires either mechanical ten-derization (such as pounding with a mallet) or long, slow cooking in a court bouillon.

Like squid, octopus is cleaned by cutting off the tentacles, discarding the head and beak, and eviscerating the body cavity. Pull the skin off the body pouch and tentacles; it may be necessary to parboil the octopus for a few minutes to loosen the skin.The skin is reddish gray, turning purple-red when cooked.

Figure 14.10 Cleaning squid.

Figure 14.10 Cleaning squid.

(a) Pull off the head. The interior organs will (b) Pull off the skin.

come out with it.

(c) Pull out the plasticlike quill from the body sac. Rinse out the sac to clean it well.

(a) Pull off the head. The interior organs will (b) Pull off the skin.

come out with it.

(c) Pull out the plasticlike quill from the body sac. Rinse out the sac to clean it well.

(d) Cut off the tentacles just above the eyes. (e) Be sure to remove the hard beak, which is (f) The body sac may be left whole for stuffing

Discard the head and organs. found at the center of the tentacle cluster, as or cut into rings for frying, sauteing, or stewing.

shown by the tip of the knife in this picture.

(d) Cut off the tentacles just above the eyes. (e) Be sure to remove the hard beak, which is (f) The body sac may be left whole for stuffing

Discard the head and organs. found at the center of the tentacle cluster, as or cut into rings for frying, sauteing, or stewing.

shown by the tip of the knife in this picture.

Continue reading here: Characteristics

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