Gravlax

Yield: 1 lb 14 oz (850g) without skin

U.S.

Metric

Ingredients

212 lb

1.2 kg

Salmon fillet, skin on

1.

4 oz

125 g

Coarse salt

4 oz

1 mL

Sugar

2.

14 tsp

125 g

White pepper

3.

2 oz

60 g

Fresh dill sprigs

Per 1 ounce:

Calories, 70; Protein, 8 g; Fat, 4 g (50% cal.); Cholesterol, 20 mg; Carbohydrates, 1 g; Fiber, 0 g; Sodium, 240 mg.

Calories, 70; Protein, 8 g; Fat, 4 g (50% cal.); Cholesterol, 20 mg; Carbohydrates, 1 g; Fiber, 0 g; Sodium, 240 mg.

Figure 26.1 Slice gravlax and smoked salmon on the diagonal into paper-thin slices. Cut toward the tail end.

Figure 26.1 Slice gravlax and smoked salmon on the diagonal into paper-thin slices. Cut toward the tail end.

Procedure

Pass your fingertips over the surface of the salmon fillet to locate any bones. Pull them out with needlenose pliers. Mix together the salt, sugar, and pepper.

Select a stainless-steel, glass, ceramic, or other nonreactive pan to hold the salmon for curing. Sprinkle a little of the salt mixture on the bottom of the pan and lay the salmon on it skin side down. Cover the flesh side of the fillet completely with a layer of the salt mixture. Then top with the dill, again covering the fillet completely.

If you are doubling this recipe and curing 2 fillets, salt the second fillet in the same manner and invert it on top of the first so the dill is sandwiched between the fillets and the skin side of each fillet is toward the outside. Cover the pan well and refrigerate for 1 day. Turn the fillet or fillets over and refrigerate for another day (for a total of 2 days). Note: Some instructions say to place a weight on the fish during the cure. This is optional. Weighting the fish produces a slightly drier, firmer finished product. After 2 days, drain off any liquid that has accumulated in the pan. Carefully scrape all the dill and curing mixture from the fish. To serve, cut on a sharp diagonal—that is, with the knife almost parallel to the table—into broad, paper-thin slices (Figure 26.1).

Smoked Salmon

Yield: 1 lb 14 oz (850g) without skin

U.S.

Metric

Ingredients

2 12 lb

1.2 kg

Salmon fillet, skin on

1.

6 oz

180 g

Coarse salt

3 oz

90 g

Sugar

2.

2 tsp

10 mL

Coarse black pepper

1 tsp

5 mL

Dry mustard

3.

12 tsp

2 mL

Ground allspice

14 tsp

1 mL

Cayenne

2 oz

60 g

Onion, chopped fine

Calories, 70; Protein, 8 g; Fat, 4 g (53% cal.); Cholesterol, 25 mg; Carbohydrates, 0 g; Fiber, 0 g; Sodium, 240 mg.

Procedure

Pass your fingertips over the surface of the salmon fillet to locate any bones. Pull them out with needlenose pliers.

Mix together the salt, sugar, pepper, dry mustard, allspice, and cayenne.

Select a stainless-steel, glass, ceramic, or other nonreactive pan to hold the salmon for curing. Sprinkle a little of the salt mixture on the bottom of the pan and lay the salmon on it skin side down. Cover the flesh side of the fillet completely with a layer of the salt mixture. Then top with the chopped onion, distributing it evenly over the fillet.

If you are doubling this recipe and curing 2 fillets, salt the second fillet in the same manner and invert it on top of the first so the onion is sandwiched between the fillets and the skin side of each fillet is toward the outside. Cover the pan well and refrigerate for 12-24 hours.

Remove the fillet from the pan and rinse off all the salt mixture and onion. Place on a rack set on a sheet pan, skin side down, and allow to dry, uncovered, in the refrigerator until a thin, dry skin (called a "pellicle") has formed on the surface of the flesh. Cold smoke at 86°F (30°C).

To serve, cut on a sharp diagonal—that is, with the knife almost parallel to the table—into broad, paper-thin slices.

Smoked Trout

Yield: 10 fillets, 6-7 oz (180-200g) each

U.S.

Metric

Ingredients

2 qt

2 L

Water

8 oz

250 g

Salt

2 oz

60 g

Light brown sugar

4

4

Bay leaves

2 tsp

10 mL

Black peppercorns

1 tsp

5 mL

Coriander seed

12 tsp

2 mL

Whole allspice

12 tsp

2 mL

Prepare the brine: Combine the water, salt, sugar, bay leaves, peppercorns, coriander, allspice, and mustard in a pot. Bring to a simmer, stirring until the salt and sugar are dissolved.

Cool, then chill the brine.

Trout fillets, about 8 oz (250 g) each

Per serving:

Calories, 320; Protein, 47 g; Fat, 12 g (36% cal.); Cholesterol, 135 mg; Carbohydrates, 2 g; Fiber, 0 g; Sodium, 3420 mg.

3. Place the trout fillets in a stainless-steel, plastic, or other nonreactive pan in a single layer. Add enough cold brine to completely cover the fillets. Place a light weight on top of the fish to keep them submerged.

4. Refrigerate for 6-8 hours.

5. Remove from the brine and rinse in cold water. Blot dry.

6. Arrange on racks and allow to dry for several hours in the refrigerator.

7. Hot smoke at 185°F (85°C) until the internal temperature of the fish reaches 145°F (63°C), about 1-1/2 hours. Cool, then refrigerate.

Smoked Duck

Yield: 2 smoked ducks U.S. Metric

Ingredients

Procedure

2 tsp

10 mL

Water

Salt

Sugar

Prague Powder #1 Bay leaves Onion powder

1. Prepare the brine: Heat the water in a pot until it is warm. Add the salt, sugar, and Prague Powder and stir until they are dissolved. Add the bay leaves and onion powder.

2. Cool, then chill the brine.

Small ducks, about 4 lb 3. Place the ducks in a stainless-steel, plastic, or other nonreactive (1.8 kg) each container. Pour enough brine over them to cover them com pletely. Weight them to keep them submerged.

4. Allow to cure in the refrigerator for 2 days. (Note: Large ducks take 3-4 days to cure.)

5. Remove the ducks from the brine and rinse well.

6. Place on a rack and let dry in the refrigerator for at least 8 hours.

7. Hot smoke at 185° until the internal temperature of the duck reaches 165°F (74°F).

Per 1 duck, without skin:

Calories, 510; Protein, 79 g; Fat, 17 g (32% cal.); Cholesterol, 305 mg; Carbohydrates, 4 g; Fiber, 0 g; Sodium, 4330 mg.

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Why Gluten Free

Why Gluten Free

What Is The Gluten Free Diet And What You Need To Know Before You Try It. You may have heard the term gluten free, and you may even have a general idea as to what it means to eat a gluten free diet. Most people believe this type of diet is a curse for those who simply cannot tolerate the protein known as gluten, as they will never be able to eat any food that contains wheat, rye, barley, malts, or triticale.

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