Clair Paste

Éclairs and cream puffs are made from a dough called éclair paste or choux paste.The French name pâte à choux (pot a shoo) means "cabbage paste," referring to the fact that cream puffs look like little cabbages.

Unlike puff pastry, éclair paste is extremely easy to make.The dough itself can be prepared in just a few minutes.This is fortunate because for best baking results, the dough should not be prepared ahead of time.

In principle, éclair paste is similar to popover batter, even though one is a thick dough and the other a thin batter. Both products are leavened by steam,which expands the product rapidly and forms large holes in the center.The heat of the oven then coagulates the gluten and egg proteins to set the structure and make a firm product. A strong flour is necessary for sufficient structure.

Éclair paste must be firm enough to hold its shape when piped from a pastry bag. Occasionally, you may find a formula that produces too slack a dough. Correct such a formula by reducing the water or milk slightly.

Proper baking temperatures are important. Start at a high temperature (425° to 475°F/215° to 245°C) for the first 10 minutes to develop steam.Then reduce the heat to 375° to 425°F (190° to 215°C) to finish baking and set the structure.The products must be firm and dry before being removed from the oven. If they are removed too soon or cooled too quickly, they may collapse. Some bakers like to leave them in a turned-off oven with the door ajar. However, if the oven must be heated again for other products, this may not be the best idea, especially in these times of high energy costs. It may be better to bake the products thoroughly, remove them carefully from the oven, and let them cool slowly in a warm place.

Ingredients

U.S.

Metric

Percentage

Water, milk,

l lb

5OO g

l33o

or half water

and half milk

Butter or

8 oz

25O g

Salt

l tsp

5 g (5 mL)

l.5%

Bread flour

l2 oz

3?5 g

lOOOO

Eggs

l lb 4 oz

625 g

l67%

Yield:

3lb S oz

1755 g

46S%

Per 1 ounce:

Calories, 70; Protein, 2 g; Fat, 4 g (56% cal.); Cholesterol, 35 mg; Carbohydrates, 5 g; Fiber, 0 g; Sodium, 90 mg.

Mixing:

1. Combine liquid, butter, and salt in a heavy saucepan and bring to a boil.

2. Remove pan from heat and add the flour all at once. Stir quickly.

3. Return the pan to moderate heat and stir vigorously until the dough forms a ball and pulls away from the sides of the pan.

4. Transfer the dough to the bowl of a mixer. If you wish to mix by hand, leave it in the saucepan.

5. With the paddle attachment, mix at low speed until the dough has cooled slightly. It should be about 140°F (60°C)—still very warm, but not too hot to touch.

6. At medium speed, beat in the eggs, a little at a time. Add no more than one-fourth of the eggs at once, and wait until each is completely absorbed before adding the next. When all the eggs are absorbed, the paste is ready to use.

Pr rocedure for Making Cream Puffs

Line sheet pans with silicone paper or butter them lightly.

Fit a large pastry bag with a plain tube. Fill the bag with the choux paste.

Pipe round mounds of dough about 11/2 inches (4 cm) in diameter onto the lined baking sheets.

If you prefer, you may drop the dough from a spoon (see Figure 34.8).

Bake at 425°F (215°C) for 10 minutes. Lower the heat to 375°F (190°C) until the puffs are well browned and very crisp.

Remove from oven and cool slowly in a warm place.

When cool, cut a slice from the top of each puff. Fill with whipped cream, Vanilla Pastry Cream (p. 1009), or desired filling, using a pastry bag with a star tube. Replace the tops and dust with confectioners' sugar.

Fill the puffs as close to service as possible. If cream-filled puffs must be held, keep them refrigerated.

Unfilled and uncut puffs, if they are thoroughly dry, may be held in plastic bags in the refrigerator for 1 week. Recrisp in the oven for a few minutes before use.

Figure 34.8

For cream puffs or profiteroles, pipe choux paste into bulbs of desired size onto greased sheet pans, or onto pans that have been lined with parchment.

Figure 34.8

For cream puffs or profiteroles, pipe choux paste into bulbs of desired size onto greased sheet pans, or onto pans that have been lined with parchment.

Pr rocedure for Making Eclairs

Proceed as for cream puffs, except pipe the dough into strips about 3A inch (2 cm) wide and 3 to 4

inches (8 to 10 cm) long (see Figure 34.9). Bake as for cream puffs.

Fill baked, cooled éclair shells with pastry cream. Two methods may be used:

• Make a small hole in one end of the shell and fill using a pastry bag or a doughnut-filling pump.

• Cut a slice lengthwise from the top and fill using a pastry bag. Dip the tops of the éclairs in chocolate fondant (p. 953).

For service and holding, see cream puffs.

Variation: Frozen Éclairs or Profiteroles

Fill éclairs or small cream puffs (profiteroles) with ice cream. Keep frozen until service.

Figure 34.9

For éclairs, pipe choux paste into fingers of desired size onto greased sheet pans, or onto pans that have been lined with parchment.

2. At service time, top with chocolate syrup.

Figure 34.9

For éclairs, pipe choux paste into fingers of desired size onto greased sheet pans, or onto pans that have been lined with parchment.

Pr rocedure for Making French Crullers or French Doughnuts_

1. Cut sheets of parchment paper to the same width as your deep fryer.

2. Using a pastry bag with a star tube, pipe choux paste onto the parchment in circles (doughnut shapes) about 2 inches (5 cm) across.

3. Slide the paper with the paste into a deep fryer heated to 375°F (190°C). Remove the paper as the doughnuts release and float free.

4. Fry the doughnuts on both sides until golden brown. French doughnuts must be completely fried, or they may collapse when cooling. Remove and drain on absorbent paper.

5. When cooled, drizzle fondant icing over the tops.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Knife Throwing Techniques of the Ninja

Knife Throwing Techniques of the Ninja

Knife Throwing Techniques of the Ninja. span stylecolor: 000000Do you want to learn the art of throwing knives? Ever wondered how it is done to perfection every time? Well here is your chance. This book contains well over 50 pages of detailed information and illustrations all about the art of knife throwing. This intriguing book focuses on the ninja's techniques and training. This is a must for all martial artists and anyone wanting to learn the knife throwing techniques of the ninja.span

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment