Boiled and Steamed Rice

Proportions

Portions: 10 Portion size: 4V2-5 oz (140 g)

U.S. Metric

Regular long-grain white rice

Rice 1 lb 475 g

Water 1 qt 1 L

Salt 1 tsp 5 mL

Butter 1 oz 30 g

Parboiled long-grain rice

Rice 1 lb 475 g

Water 412 cups 1.1 L

Salt 1 tsp 5 mL

Butter 1 oz 30 g

Medium-grain white rice

Rice 18 oz 525 g

Water 1 qt 1 L

Salt 1 tsp 5 mL

Butter 1 oz 30 g

Brown rice

Rice 12 oz 350 g

Water 1 qt 1 L

Salt 1 tsp 5 mL

Butter 1 oz 30 g

Calories 200; Protein, 4 g; Fat, 2.5 g (12% cal.); Cholesterol, 5 mg; Carbohydrates, 39 g; Fiber 1 g; Sodium, 260 mg.

Calories 200; Protein, 4 g; Fat, 2.5 g (12% cal.); Cholesterol, 5 mg; Carbohydrates, 39 g; Fiber 1 g; Sodium, 260 mg.

Procedures

Rangetop

Oven

Steamer

1.

Wash rice in cold water until water is

1.

Wash rice in cold water until water is

1.

Wash rice in cold water until water is

clear (optional step; see pp. 620-621

clear (optional step; see pp. 620-621

clear (optional step; see pp. 620-621

for note on washing rice).

for note on washing rice).

for note on washing rice).

2.

Combine all ingredients in a heavy pot.

2.

Bring salted water to boil. Combine all

2.

Bring salted water to boil. Combine all

Bring to boil. Stir. Cover and cook over

ingredients in a shallow steamer pan.

ingredients in a shallow steamer pan.

very low heat.

Cover with foil or tight lid. Place in

Place uncovered pan in steamer for

375°F (175°C) oven.

cooking time recommended by equip-

ment manufacturer.

Cooking times:

Cooking times:

Cooking times:

Long- and medium-grain: 15-20

Long- and medium-grain:

Depend on type of steamer.

minutes

25 minutes

Parboiled: 20-25 minutes

Parboiled: 30-40 minutes

Brown: 40-45 minutes

Brown: 1 hour

3.

Test rice for doneness. Cook 2-4 min

3.

Test rice for doneness. Bake 2-4

3.

Test rice for doneness. Steam 2-4

utes more if necessary.

minutes more if necessary.

minutes more if necessary.

4.

Turn rice out into a hotel pan. Fluff

4.

Fluff rice with fork or slotted spoon to

4.

Fluff rice with fork or slotted spoon to

with fork or slotted spoon to let steam

let steam escape.

let steam escape.

escape.

Granular meals such as cornmeal can be stirred into boiling water if care is taken to add the grain slowly and stir constantly and vigorously while doing so,in order to avoid lumps. See the recipe for polenta (p. 632). Alternatively, combine the meal with cold liquid, stir, and bring to a simmer while continuing to stir. Mixing the meal with cold liquid separates the granules to prevent lumping.

Procedure for Simmering Meals and Cereals

1.

Measure the correct amount of liquid into a pot and bring to a boil.

2.

Measure the correct amount of meal or cereal.

3.

Add the cereal slowly to the boiling liquid, stirring constantly.

4.

Stir until some thickening takes place. Depending on the grain, continue to stir constantly, or

stir only occasionally. Some cereals, such as oatmeal, become gummy with excessive stirring.

5.

Reduce heat to a slow simmer and cook to desired doneness and consistency.

6.

To prevent drying, keep the cooked grain covered until serving.

Variation: Simmering Meals and Granular Cereals

The procedure is the same as above, except the cereal is mixed with cold liquid. This separates

the grains to prevent lumping. Place the mixture in a pot, bring to a simmer, and cook as in the

basic procedure.

The Pilaf Method

The pilaf method is equivalent to braising.The grain is first sauteed in fat, then cooked in liquid—preferably in the oven for uniform heating—until the liquid is absorbed (see Figure 19.1).The fat helps keep the grains separate and adds flavor.

It is normal to measure rice by volume when making pilaf, as the proportions are based on volume measure. One pint of raw rice weighs about 14 ounces, or 1 pound measures about 23/4 cups (1 liter weighs about 875 grams, or 1 kilogram measures 1.15 liters). Regarding exact measurements, see the note following the pilaf recipe.

Procedure for Cooking Grain by the Pilaf Method

1.

Heat the desired fat (such as butter or olive oil) in a heavy pan. Add chopped onion or other aromatic vegetable, if desired, and sauté until soft but not browned.

2.

Add the grain. Stir to coat the grains with fat.

3.

Cook the grain in the fat, stirring, to toast the grain lightly.

4.

Add the proper amount of hot liquid.

5.

Bring to a simmer, stirring occasionally.

6.

Cover tightly. Cook on the stovetop or, preferably, in an oven, for the correct length of time, depending on the grain.

7.

Remove from the heat and let stand, covered, to allow the moisture to be absorbed uniformly by the grain.

The Risotto Method

Risotto is a classic Italian preparation made by a special procedure that is like neither the boiling method nor the pilaf method. After sauteing the rice, add a small amount of stock or other liquid and stir until the liquid is absorbed. Repeat this procedure until the rice is cooked but still firm. Risotto should be served quickly, as it does not hold well.The finished product has a creamy consistency due to the starch that is cooked out of the rice.The grains are not fluffy and separate.

The word risotto comes from the Italian word riso, meaning "rice." Other grains can be cooked using the same method, although strictly speaking they should not be called risotto. In Italy, farro cooked by the risotto method is called farotto, and orzo pasta cooked this way is called orzotto. In the English-speaking world, however, the word risotto is more likely to be understood and is often used on menus, but with the grain specified if any type other than rice is used.

Procedure for Cooking Grain by the Risotto Method

1.

Heat the desired fat (such as butter or olive oil) in a heavy pan. Add chopped onion or other aro

matic vegetable, if desired, and sauté until soft but not browned.

2.

Add the grain. Stir to coat the grains with fat.

3.

Cook the grain in the fat, stirring, to toast the grain lightly.

4.

Add a small amount of boiling liquid. Cook slowly, stirring, until the liquid is absorbed by the

grain.

5.

Add a second small quantity of liquid and repeat the procedure.

6.

Continue adding a small quantity of liquid at a time, stirring constantly, and waiting until the liq-

uid is absorbed before adding more.

7.

Stop adding liquid when the grain is tender but still firm. It should be moist and creamy but not

runny.

(d) Bring to a boil and cover. Cook at low heat on (e) The finished pilaf.

top of the stove or in the oven for the required time.

Continue reading here: Rice Pilaf

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