L balsamic vinegar

Balsamic vinegar is associated with Mediterranean cuisines. Traditional balsamic vinegars are aged for a minimum of 12 years. The manufacture involves a long and slow evaporation process in wooden barrels. It can take as much as seventy pounds of grapes to produce just one cup of balsamic vinegar. The quality of balsamic can vary greatly. When using a true aged Aceto Balsamica, very little is needed. An aged balsamic is an awe-inspiring combination of sweet, sour, and a myriad of other complex...

O chocolate sabayon mousse with mangochilli gele

6 ounces semisweet couveture chocolate 2 sheets gelatin 16 ounces heavy cream 1 tbsp ground canela cinnamon o Chop the chocolate and melt over a double boiler. O Whip the cream to soft peaks an d pl ace in the refrigerator. o Whip yolks and sugar on a double boiler until the mixture thickens and doubles in volume. o Slowly add the tequila to the yolk mixture while continuing to whisk. o Once the gelatin has bloomed, wring out the excess water and add the gelatin to the hot sabayon mixture. o...

Introduction

Traditionally the culinary (or savory) world and pastry world have been viewed as two separate entities. The culinary world with its pungent herbs and spices, proteins, and vegetables utilizes a wide range of cooking techniques. The pastry world utilizes a rather more limited list of ingredients and uses baking as its primary cooking technique. There is a new world of flavor possibilities for the pastry chef who begins to fuse savory ingredients and cooking techniques into his or her pastries....

Clear Sauces

Clear sauces are those made without any fat. The clear refers to the crisp, clean, clear flavors that result when fat is left out of a recipe. You have already tasted a clear sauce in Chapter 1, the clear caramel sauce. In this case, water was added to the caramelized sugar instead of the more traditional heavy cream and butter. You experienced the depth of flavor, the full deep plate profile that was the result. Consider infusing the liquid for a clear sauce with an herb or spice to make this...

Foams as a Sauce Alternative

Foams can take many forms, but in all cases they are a liquid composed of a multitude of bubbles. The stability of these bubbles is what will dictate the ultimate form and look of the foam. The simplest form of a foam is made by incorporating air into ice-cold whole milk. The result is a foam with large light bubbles. The bubbles resemble soap bubbles. They are clearly delineated from each other. Heat milk to infuse desired flavors. Allow to steep if needed. Chill milk until icy cold and then...

Sugar as a Base Note

Imagine biting into a piece of peanut bri ttle or En glish toff ee. There is a lot of chewing involved. The flavors incorporated into this type of hard sugar remain on your palate for a relatively long time. In this way, sugar can move from its original spot as a top note, to a position as a base note on a plated dessert. Infuse the caramel with flavors from the dessert. Be cautious, however, about adding items with a high water content. Remember that sugar is hygroscopic. It has the ability to...

Distinguishing Between Ortho and Retro Nasal Perceptions of Flavor

Use 3 parts water to 1 part granulated sugar by volume (1 cup of water to 1 3 cup of sugar). Add fresh lemon juice and a bit of zest until the water is lightly flavored. Do not make lemonade The water should have a noticeable but gentle lemon flavor. Bring the mixture up to a boil and then let cool. Divide the liquid into two cups. Plug your nose with one hand and sip from cup 1. Pay close attention to the flavor, or lack thereof. Release your nose and notice...

O maple syrup

Maple syrup is produced from the sap of maple trees. It is full of nutty-like, vanilla notes. The production of maple syrup is concentrated primarily in the northeastern region of the United States. This is due to spring weather conditions there. The sap of the maple trees is collected within a short span, starting with the first true thaw and ending when the tree buds start to open. The sap runs best after a severe winter and in areas where there are great swings in temperature between morning...

L carrots

The idea of using carrots in the pastry world is not new consider their traditional use in a cake or quick bread. The natural sweetness of carrots makes them a logical choice for use in desserts. Raw, sauteed, steamed, roasted, or fried carrots in almost any form lend a flavorful component to any plated dessert. The flavor identity of a carrot changes vastly according to the manner in which it is cooked. Using carrots in their raw state preserves their crisp, clean notes. The natural sweetness...

L tamarind

As one of the ingredients in Worcestershire sauce, probably most everyone has come into contact with tamarind at least once. Tamarind by itself, however, is a completely different matter. Tamarind refers to the pulp that encases the seeds of the tamarind pod. It is a member of the bean family. With a papery, fibrous skin outside, the sticky pulp surrounds several rather large seeds within each pod, or bean. In the pulp lies the heart of tamarind's overwhelmingly sour flavor. That sourness is at...

Partner with

Fruits apples, apricots, bananas, blackberries, blueberries, cherries, cranberries, figs, kumquats, lemons, limes, mangoes, nectarines, oranges, papayas, passion fruit, peaches, pears, pineapple, plums, raspberries, rhubarb, strawberries Vegetables beets, carrots, corn, fennel, onions, squash (acorn, butternut, and pumpkin), sweet potatoes Dairy buttermilk, cheddar cheese, cr me fra che, goat cheese, mascar-pone cheese, ricotta cheese, sour cream Sweeteners brown sugar, molasses, raw sugar Nuts...

O balsamic reduction

O Although referred to here as a reduction, a great ag ed balsamic can be used as is, straight from the bottle. An aged Aceto Balsamico will give the plate a depth of flavor not achieved with less expensive balsamic vinegars. O A thinner balsamic vinegar can be used. Simply reduce it in a saucepan until it reaches the consistency of maple syrup. The addition of a small amount of granulated sugar will expedite the thickening process and round out the flavors of the vinegar. Sour notes can be...

Ounces fondant 2 ounces glucose 2 ounces pistachios

Place pistachios on a sheet pan and roast in a 350 F (175 C) oven until a light golden brown. Place fondant and glucose in a small saut pan and set over mediumhigh heat. Stir occasionally and remove from heat once the mixture has become a light honey brown color. Pour the hot caramel onto a Silpat and let cool at room temperature. Once the caramel has hardened, break into shards an Using short bursts, grind until a fine powder is formed. Sprinkle a thin layer of the powder on a Silpat and place...

O sea saltfleur de sel

The difference between salts, specifically fleur de sel or flower of salt, and other types of salt lies in the manner in which they are produced. Mass-produced salts use artificial means of extracting salt either from the sea or from deeply buried salt deposits. The salt is then refined and anti-caking ingredients are added. The result is a relatively harsh and flat salty flavor. Sea salt, however, is produced through natural evaporation. Seawater is placed in shallow containers and allowed to...

Plated desserts

The previous sections of this book have given you the tools to construct flavorful and thoughtful plated desserts. Part 1 established a vocabulary for discussing and analyzing flavor. Part 2 laid the groundwork for the mechanics of flavor, including cooking techniques, sauce work, and the manipulation of texture. Part 3 analyzed the use of culinary ingredients in the construction of plated desserts. This section takes all of that information and applies it to the development of specific plated...

O mint clear sauce

4 ounces fresh mint leaves 2 ounces light corn syrup o Blanch the mint leaves. Plunge them into boiling water and then place immediately into ice water. Remove the leaves from the ice water and pat them dry with paper towels. o Place the leaves in a small robot coupe or food processor. o Slowly add the l ight corn syrup. Strain the syrup through cheesecloth. (Note It is easiest to place the syrup in the cheesecloth, bundle up the top, and, using a wringing motion, squeeze the syrup through the...

L asiago cheese

Cheese is, for the most part, simply a way of preserving and storing milk. It requires milk, fermentation, and the addition of rennet enzymes, which curdle the milk. In the simplest terms, the milk is soured and curdled. The watery whey is drained off, and the remaining curds are salted, cut, and pressed into some kind of mold. The result takes on thousands of variations throughout the world. Cheese flavors range from the mild to the downright stinky. They can be smooth and rich as butter or...

O cardamom

A native of south India, cardamom grows on a shrub. The cardamom pods are the dried fruit of this perennial herb. Individual cardamom pods are green with a papery outer skin. Between 30 and 35 tiny black seeds are packed inside of each pod. The oblong pods are picked before they are completely ripened and are then cured by drying. The harvesting of the pods is all done by hand this contributes to cardamom's high price. It is the third most costly spice in the world, following saffron and...

O gingerbread cake

8 ounces all-purpose or pastry flour tsp dried mustard powder 4 tsp ground cloves 1 whole egg 12 ounces molasses 4 ounces melted butter 4 ounces hot water o Sift all dry ingredients. O Whisk together the egg and the molasses. o Add the melted butter to the wet ingredients and blend well. O Mix tog ether the wet and dry ingredients. o When all of the ingredients are almost completely incorporated, add the hot water. o Place in a greased pan, or ungreased flexi pans in a 350 F 175 C oven. Bake...