Notes

Early, New England Cookbook, 58 Fischer, Albion's Seed, 135-36. 1. McManis, Colonial New England, 27 Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation, 62. For a discussion of some of the promotional literature about New England specifically, see Cressy, Coming Over, 1-36. 2. To be more precise about those thousands of native people'' according to one estimate, the Indian population of the area now defined as New England at the beginning of the seventeenth century was 112,000, according to another, 139,000....

Pork Cookery

Anne Wilson, in Britain from medieval times ''pork was almost as well liked as beef.'' This was fortunate since, as we have seen, swine was the nation's principal source of meat. Souse, pickled for long keeping, was through the eighteenth century the form of salted pork that figured most largely in the British diet, both for everyday eating and Christmas feasting. As time went on, the meaning of souse got attached less to all the parts of the pig and more to the head, ears,...

Preservation and Preserves

The native people of New England probably ate the majority of their fruit fresh and only a minority preserved and or cooked. Among the colonists, the situation was reversed. European tradition stretching back to the Greco-Roman physician Galen had held that fresh fruit was unhealthy. The medieval opinion that ''raw pears a poison, baked a medicine be'' was still being echoed in a seventeenth-century English medical treatise ''And all manner of fruit generally fill the blood with water, which...

Info

Hen the small band of separatists from the Church of England whom we call the Pilgrims arrived at Cape Cod in November 1620, they entered an abundant land. But they faced some major obstacles to enjoying the foods around them. While there was much talk in Europe at the time about the wondrous plants and animals of the New World, few Europeans could distinguish fact from fancy among claims about new discoveries. The fish and game looked similar to Old World species, but much of the plant life...

Jizzy Pixley Golden Pound Cake

Mintz, Sweetness and Power, 69, 126 Martin, Standard of Living in i860, 36, 72. 75. Mintz, Sweetness and Power, 22, 87 Stowe, Oldtown Folks, 110-11 (chap. 10). 76. Cummings, American andHis Food, 80-81. The paleness hierarchy existed in the world of maple syrups and sugars as well. In spite of the overall dominance of cane sugar, maple was produced on a significant scale in northern New England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The highest Fancy rating was accorded to syrup that...

I980

Nicholas, June 1880, 604-605. Reprinted in Our Holidays in Poetry, compiled by Mildred P. Harrington and Josephine H. Thomas, 144-47. New York Wilson, 1929. -. Hobomok and Other Writings on Indians (1824). Edited by Carolyn L. Karcher. New Brunswick, N.J. Rutgers University Press, 1986. -. The New England Boy's Song about Thanksgiving Day.'' In Representative Poems On-line, edited by I. Lancashire. Toronto Web Development Group, Information Technology Services,...

I0i

76- Johnson, Johnson's Wonder-Working Providence, 85, 210 Field, 'Peculiar Ma-nuerance,''' 20. 77- Pendery, Archeology of Urban Foodways in Portsmouth, New Hampshire,'' 21-22 Coe and Coe, Mid-Eighteenth-Century Food and Drink on the Massachusetts Frontier,'' 42 Derven, ''Wholesome, Toothsome, and Diverse,'' 56. 78- Martin, Standard of Living in i860, 49 Sewall, Diary, 1 380 20 October 1697 King, When I Lived in Salem, 25. Venison, either roasted or cooked at the table in the manner described by...

Frogs Legs and Turtle Soup

In Oldtown Folks Miss Debby summed up a widespread American attitude toward French food and culture ''I never saw any good of the French language . . . nor, for that matter, of the French nation either they eat frogs, and break the Sabbath, and are as immoral as the old Canaanites.'' Persistent as that strain has been, New Englanders also had a tradition of admiring the French, and of eating frogs' legs. John Adams regretted that the colonists ''had been taught by their former 'absurd masters'...