URLhttpwww vitalitacomDesserts of Vitality

short-grain rice creates the most finely textured flour. I have also tried making brown rice flour with ioo% sweet brown rice (since it is also a short-grain rice), but the effect of this flour was to create a baked good that was too dense and gummy, similar to mochi (a product make from pounding cooked sweet brown rice). I have successfully used flour made from sweet brown rice as a small portion of the flour in a recipe (not so much in cakes, but more so in brownies and cookies), and have liked the resulting texture since it acts like a binder, similar to tapioca flour or tapioca powder. You just don't want to use too much, or it will make the texture too gooey.

Whether using freshly ground flour or already ground flour (i.e., from a bag or bulk bin), fluff up the flour in the bag or container with a fork so that each cup will weigh 4 ounces. If you measure it while it is compressed, you could end up with significantly more flour, and this could effect the results.

The cake and pie crust recipes generally call for brown rice flour or other non-gluten flours. More information about the why this cookbook emphasizes non-gluten flours and grains can be found at the beginning of this cookbook. In general, any combination of the below listed flours can be used. Cookies are especially easy to use a more diverse set of flours, and any of the below listed flours are possibilities.

Non-gluten flours to use for desserts: whole-grain brown rice (from short grain rice or from sweet brown rice, but only in small proportions), whole-grain amaranth, whole-grain teff, whole-grain millet, and/or sorghum flour.

Flours with gluten to use for desserts: whole-grain pastry wheat, whole-grain kamut (very similar to wheat), whole-grain spelt (very similar to wheat), and/or whole-grain oat (either ground from oat groats or from food processed rolled oats).

Often, when a recipe calls for non-gluten flour (like brown rice flour), it also calls for finely ground tapioca powder and/or ground flax seed to assist in the binding of the non-gluten flour. (Note, you can either buy tapioca powder or grind it yourself from tapioca balls - one way to grind tapioca balls to a powder is to use a coffee grinder.) If you don't want to use a non-gluten flour (e.g., if you want to use spelt flour), then all 3 of these dry ingredient items can be replaced with a flour that contains gluten.

NOTE: As you change the flours used in a dessert, the proportion of wet ingredients required may change (due to different moisture levels in different flours, and how they absorb moisture), so adjustments may be needed to give the right consistency to the batter/dough. For example, teff flour in a pie crust may not require as much liquid as whole wheat pastry flour to make a good, rollable pie crust dough. Additionally, using pre-ground flours instead of fresh ground flours from whole grains may change the amount of wet ingredients required. Lastly, humidity at time of baking and length of flour storage can cause the amount of wet ingredients required to vary from those stated in the recipes._

Per serving: o Calories; og Fat (o% calories from fat); og Protein; og Carbohydrate; omg Cholesterol; omg Sodium

Preparation Time: o minutes

Preparation Time: o minutes

Total Fat o.og

Saturated Fat o.og Cholesterol omg Sodium omg Carbohydrate o.og

Dietary Fiber o.og Protein o.og o.o% o.o% o.o% o.o%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,ooo calorie diet.

Amount Per Serving

Calories Calories from fat

Amount Per Serving

Calories Calories from fat

Total Fat o.og

Saturated Fat o.og Cholesterol omg Sodium omg Carbohydrate o.og

Dietary Fiber o.og Protein o.og

% Daily Value*

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,ooo calorie diet.

Dessert Notes - 2: SWEETENERS

Maple syrup is the most common sweetener called for in this cookbook because it is natural and unrefined, contains some nutrients (unlike white sugar), is very sweet (which is important for making good, satisfying desserts), its flavor is very pleasant, it adds moisture, and it goes well with many desserts. Agave nectar (light agave nectar syrup) is also a very good liquid sweetener that can be used in addition to maple syrup, or in place of it. It has many of the same characteristics of maple syrup (natural, unrefined, very sweet), except that its flavor is very subtle, similar to honey. Powdered Sucanat (see the "Glossary of Ingredients") is a good choice if you are looking for a non-liquid sweetener (it is very sweet like maple syrup; these two can be used interchangeably, but with modification to the amount of liquids; see below in "Sweetener Substitutions").

Brown rice syrup and barley malt syrup are two of my most preferred natural sweeteners because they are complex sugars which are not hard on the body/blood sugar levels. Brown rice syrup is my favorite sweetener because it has the most mild flavor (not as strong as barley malt syrup), and its pH is closer to our bodies pH than any of the other sweeteners, making it the most gentle on our bodies. Keep in mind that both brown rice syrup and barley malt syrup are about half as sweet as maple syrup.

Often times I "balance" brown rice syrup with maple syrup in a recipe because brown rice syrup all by itself has a slightly bitter butterscotch flavor, so I like to round out that flavor with the straight sweet flavor of maple syrup.

I also like blackstrap molasses, sorghum syrup, and ribbon cane syrup which have very distinctive flavors. Molasses is generally only good for certain situations where its strong flavor works with the dessert.

Other alternative sweeteners include: sucanat syrup (liquid), concentrated fruit juice (e.g., apple), date sugar (dry), date syrup, brown rice powder (dried brown rice syrup), barley malt powder, and maple sugar (dry).

For specific information about sweeteners for cakes, see "Cake Notes" later in this book.

SWEETENER SUBSTITUTIONS

As mentioned above, when replacing a liquid sweetener (such as maple syrup) with a dry sweetener (such as sucanat), the liquid quantities will have to be increased to make up for the loss of liquid. Vice versa for replacing dry sweeteners with liquid sweeteners. In general, I do not recommend replacing liquid sweeteners with dry sweeteners in icing and uncooked custard recipes because the dry sweeteners tend to be gritty in these cases (because they are not cooked in a liquid).

When replacing liquid sweeteners with other liquid sweeteners, the main consideration is sweetness. A secondary consideration is the flavor; brown rice syrup and barley malt syrup have a slightly bitter flavor; if large quantities are used, they can give a dessert too much of a bitter edge; it is often best to balance these slightly bitter syrups with other "non-bitter" sweeteners such as maple syrup, agave nectar, sucanat, or concentrated fruit juice.

When making variations to recipes, it is common to change the proportions of maple syrup and brown rice syrup/ barley malt syrup (especially in cookie recipes where texture is greatly effected by the type of sweetener used). As mentioned above, brown rice syrup and barley malt syrup are half as sweet as maple syrup. Therefore, if you want to replace some of the maple syrup called for in a recipes (e.g., a cookie recipe), with brown rice syrup, and you want to keep the recipe with the same level of sweetness, you should make some modification to add additional sweetness. When replacing small quantities of maple syrup with brown rice syrup (e.g., 2 tablespoons of maple syrup), it is generally fine to go ahead and simply use twice as much brown rice syrup to get to the same sweetness. When replacing larger quantities of maple syrup (e.g., replacing 1/2 cup of maple syrup), it is best not to use twice as much brown rice syrup to get the same level of sweetness. Rather, it is best to use a slightly larger quantity of brown rice syrup, and then supplement that with a dry sweetener (e.g., sucanat). This way, the proportion of liquid ingredients to dry ingredients will not be significantly effected. For instance, if there was a cookie recipe that called for 1 cup of maple syrup, and you wanted to replace half of that with brown rice syrup, you could use 1/2 cup maple syrup, 2/3 cup brown rice syrup, and 3 tablespoons sucanat. This substitution does increase the total amount used, but does not significantly change the proportion of dry to wet ingredients, nor does it significantly change the sweetness.

OILS

The most common oil used in these desserts is refined walnut oil because it is not a heavy oil and has very little flavor, allowing the flavor of the dessert to shine through. See the "Glossary of Ingredients" for more information about refined walnut oil. Canola oil can be used in place of refined walnut oil in any of the recipes in this cookbook. Sunflower oil can also be used as a replacement, but it can be a bit heavier than walnut oil (especially unrefined sunflower oil). In general, refined oils tend to be lighter and with less flavor in baked goods, and can go to higher temperatures without breaking down or burning. Unrefined oils (some manufactures produce unrefined sunflower oil, unrefined safflower oil, and unrefined soy oil for example) can be more healthful, but can sometimes make cakes and some other baked goods heavier (denser) and with a stronger flavor of the oil. Depending on what you are trying to achieve as far as texture and flavor, they can sometimes be a good choice. For example, in some cookies and brownies, a heavier oil with more flavor can be a good thing. When choosing an unrefined oil, make sure it can go up to at least 212 degrees F (ioo degrees C) as some unrefined oils should only be used at lower cooking temperatures. Even if the baking temperature for a baked good is around 375 degrees F (i9o degrees C), it is still alright to use oils that should only be heated to 212 degrees F (ioo degrees C) because the internal temperature of the baked good probably will not go over that temperature.

In addition, sometimes I call for unrefined coconut oil, non-hydrogenated vegetable shortening, or non-hydrogenated vegetable oil spread. You can read more about these different types of fats in the "Glossary of Ingredients".

Additionally, you may like to experiment with other oils such as unrefined hazelnut, unrefined almond, or unrefined walnut if these fit with the flavor of the dessert you are making.

GARNISHES

I like to garnish desserts with various colorful food to enhance the presentation. For example, fresh fruit (either whole, sliced, or pureed as a sauce) add a very nice color contrast to some desserts (particularly ice creams/ sorbets). I also like toasted nuts for texture diversity (again, especially with ice creams/sorbets). I often glaze these nuts with maple syrup (and sometimes a bit of oil and/or some liqueur) so they have a shiny look instead of a dull look (see "Glossary of Cooking Terms" for more information on toasting/glazing nuts, or see the "o9-Frangelico-Glazed Toasted Hazelnuts" recipe as an example). Other possible garnishes are shaved chocolate pieces, citrus zest in long thin strands, edible flours, dried fruits, candied ginger, and toasted shredded coconut.

For specific garnishing ideas for cakes, see "Cake Notes" later in this book._

Per serving: o Calories; og Fat (o% calories from fat); og Protein; og Carbohydrate; omg Cholesterol; omg Sodium

Preparation Time: o minutes

Preparation Time: o minutes

Total Fat o.og

Saturated Fat o.og Cholesterol omg Sodium omg Carbohydrate o.og

Dietary Fiber o.og Protein o.og o.o% o.o% o.o% o.o%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,ooo calorie diet.

Amount Per Serving

Calories Calories from fat

Amount Per Serving

Calories Calories from fat

Total Fat o.og

Saturated Fat o.og Cholesterol omg Sodium omg Carbohydrate o.og

Dietary Fiber o.og Protein o.og

% Daily Value*

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,ooo calorie diet.

- Icing recipes reference in these cake recipes are contained in the next chapter.

- Refer to the "Cake Notes" at the front of this chapter for information about making cakes (including the methods that can be used to make a cake more "decadent", and other methods to make a cake lower in fat)._

Per serving: o Calories; og Fat (0% calories from fat); og Protein; og Carbohydrate; omg Cholesterol; omg Sodium

Preparation Time: o minutes

Preparation Time: o minutes

Total Fat o.og

Saturated Fat o.og Cholesterol omg Sodium omg Carbohydrate o.og

Dietary Fiber o.og Protein o.og o.o% o.o% o.o% o.o%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,ooo calorie diet.

Amount Per Serving

Calories Calories from fat

Amount Per Serving

Calories Calories from fat

Total Fat o.og

Saturated Fat o.og Cholesterol omg Sodium omg Carbohydrate o.og

Dietary Fiber o.og Protein o.og

% Daily Value*

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,ooo calorie diet.

Cake Notes:

BASIS FOR THE VEGAN CAKES IN THIS CHAPTER

All of the cakes in this cookbook are based on the "Maple Cake" (see the recipe below). I have listed two versions of this cake: the "Maple Cake" and the "Maple Cake-Low Fat."

The "Maple Cake" version is richer, and I have found that people who are used to traditional desserts (with butter, cream, refined sugar, etc.) find this version more satisfying. Some people who follow a low-fat diet, consider this a special occasion cake.

The "Maple Cake-Low Fat" is particularly low-fat with less than or equal to 15% calories from fat. The methods employed to make this a lower fat cake, can be applied to any cake recipe in this book. See below in the "TECHNIQUES FOR MAKING A LOWER FAT CAKE" section for more information.

CAKE PANS

Most of the cakes in this book make 2o small servings (these are pretty small pieces). The batter for these cakes fit nicely into two io inch round spring form pans and this is the best scenario for the recommended two layer cake. It is also possible to use a 9 inch by 13 inch baking pan, but this amount of batter baked in one of these pans will take longer to bake due to the increase thickness.

PARCHMENT PAPER

For easy removal of a cake from the pan, before filling cake pan with batter, cut a piece of parchment paper to the exact size of the bottom of the pan. Then after oiling the pan, place this cut paper inside the pan on the bottom. Oil the top of the paper and sprinkle a little flour on top. The pan is now ready to be filled with batter. If the cake is being served from the pan, then it is not so important to have the entire cake be easily removed from the pan at all once, but if the cake needs to be removed from the pan for decorating (e.g., a two-layer cake), it is better if the cake releases easily from the pan. The use of parchment paper is a particularly good practice if you are making a cake with millet flour because it has a tendency to stick to even a well oiled pan.

TECHNIQUES FOR MAKING A LOWER FAT CAKE

Any of the cakes in this cookbook can be made lower in fat by following the template for the "Maple Cake-Low Fat". Overall, the features for lowering the fat content/percentage of calories from fat are as follows:

1) use applesauce and/or prune puree in place of the oil (see below)

2) use water in place of coconut milk (if the original recipes calls for coconut milk)

3) use fewer or no nuts and/or shredded coconut

4) if the cake calls for hard chocolate (mainly non-dairy bittersweet chocolate) (either in the cake or in the icing), use cocoa in its place - replace each ounce (27 grams) of hard chocolate with 3 tablespoons of cocoa.

TECHNIQUES FOR MAKING A MORE DECADENT CAKE

Cakes in this cookbook can be made even more "decadent" as follows (some of these are used in the "Maple Cake"):

1) use canola oil in place of applesauce and/or prune puree

2) use unrefined coconut oil or non-hydrogenated vegetable shortening in place of walnut or canola oil and/or applesauce and/or prune puree (see the notes about oils in the "Dessert Notes" section).

3) use coconut milk in place of water

4) use more nuts and/or shredded coconut (either in the cake, or while decorating)

5) if the cake calls for cocoa (either in the cake or in the icing), use chopped, ground or melted hard chocolate (mainly non-dairy bittersweet chocolate) to replace some or all of the cocoa - 3 tablespoons of cocoa is the equivalent of 1 ounce (27 grams) of hard chocolate.

FAT REPLACERS

See the discussion in "Dessert Notes" earlier in this book. In general, I always use at least a little applesauce (or fresh apple puree) in the batter (even when making a "decadent" cake) because I think it gives the cake a very desirable moistness.

FLOUR

I like brown rice flour best in cakes because it produces a fine texture, has a light flavor, and is not as gritty as some other flours (e.g., amaranth flour). If grinding the flour yourself, be sure to use short-grain brown rice. See the "Dessert Notes" discussion earlier in this book for more information.

SWEETENERS

Maple syrup is the natural, unrefined sweetener of choice for making cakes. Agave syrup is a good choice as well, and can be used 1 for 1 in place of maple syrup. Sucanat (in its dry form - see Sucanat in the "Glossary of Ingredients") can be used 1 for 1 in place of maple syrup (with the liquid ingredients), but maple syrup gives the cake more moisture. If sucanat is used in place of maple syrup, additional liquid will be needed.

I have not had good luck in using heavier liquid sweeteners (such as brown rice syrup and barley malt syrup) in cakes - it makes the cake too dense, and often causes the inside of the cake to stay uncooked. But I have successfully used blackstrap molasses for making cakes.

For icings, I generally prefer to use a different natural, unrefined sweetener such as brown rice syrup or barley malt syrup (depending on what flavor I am looking for) in combination with maple syrup or agave syrup. The heavier syrups (such as brown rice syrup) work well in icings (even helping the icing to set to the cake since they are often thicker), and they are less expensive and contain a higher ratio of complex sugars to simple sugars than maple syrup.

For a more detailed discussion of sweeteners, refer to "Dessert Notes" earlier in this book. OILS

See the discussion "Dessert Notes" earlier in this book. <Cake Notes Continued in "Cake Notes - 2".>

Per serving: 0 Calories; 0g Fat (0% calories from fat); 0g Protein; 0g Carbohydrate; 0mg Cholesterol; 0mg Sodium

Preparation Time: o minutes

Amount Per Serving

Calories Calories from fat

% Daily Value*

Total Fat o.og

Saturated Fat o.og Cholesterol omg Sodium omg Carbohydrate o.og o% o% o% o% o% o% o%

Dietary Fiber o.og Protein o.og

Vitamin A Vitamin C Calcium Iron o.o% o.o% o.o% o.o%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,ooo calorie diet.

BAKING

Always pre-heat the oven.

In general, cakes should be baked until they slightly pull away from the sides of the pan and/or a toothpick inserted into the middle of the cake comes out fairly clean. You will not be able to use the toothpick method as well if a cake has chocolate chunks or fruit added to it. Also be careful not to overbake the cakes because they can become too dry and dense in this case.

Bake cakes for less time when using a convection oven.

When removing cakes from the oven, place them on a some type of rack so that air can circulate beneath the pan (but not with a breeze around the pan). This will help it cool more evenly, and prevent the bottom of the cake from getting soggy due to slower cooling at the bottom of the pan. Do not try to remove the cake from the pan while it is still hot.

I like to garnish a cake with various colorful food to enhance the presentation and give people an idea of what is in the cake (or what type of cake it is). For example, raspberries add a very nice color contrast to a chocolate cake, and if it has a raspberry filling, it gives people an idea of the flavors inside. I also like toasted nuts on cakes to add a crunchy element to a moist/soft cake (as well as enhance and diversify flavors). I often glaze these nuts with maple syrup (and sometimes a bit of oil and/or some liqueur) so they have a shiny look instead of a dull look (see "Glossary of Cooking Terms" for more information on toasting/glazing nuts, or see the "o9-Frangelico-Glazed Toasted Hazelnuts" recipe as an example). Other possible garnishes are shaved chocolate pieces for chocolate cakes, citrus zest in long thin strands, fresh fruits in various forms (e.g., whole raspberries, slices of kiwi), edible flours, dried fruits, candied ginger, and toasted shredded coconut. It all depends on the flavors in the cake, and if you want to enhance or diversify the flavors.

Lastly, serving cakes sitting in a shallow "pool" of a dessert sauce is often very attractive, and can add a nice color and flavor contrast. If a bit more fat is acceptable, a nut cream/sauce is a good choice. Alternatively, low-fat dessert sauces can be made from fruit puree. Sauces can also add moisture to a cake that might be a little drier than desired.

SERVING SIZE

All of the cakes in this cookbook make 2o SMALL servings (they are quite small pieces). This could be the equivalent of io servings depending on how big people like their pieces of cake! If you want to make a io small serving cake, cut the ingredients for a 2o serving cake in half and then instead of using two io inch round spring form pans, use two 7 inch round pans (this will still make it a layered cake).

STORING CAKES

I like to make my cakes just a few hours before serving. If the icing is quite firm, the cake should not have to be refrigerated at all. Refrigerating the cake may be needed if it has not all been consumed after one day. Unfortunately, refrigerating cakes dries them out, and makes them denser. If you do refrigerate a cake, they should be well covered to minimized these negative effects. These cakes will generally keep covered in the refrigerator for up to 5 days, but lower fat cakes will not keep as long since they tend to dry out and get stale even faster than cakes with more fat. Covering the cakes should also keep undesirable odors from permeating the cake. When icing is covering part of the cake, moisture loss will be reduced in that area. When cut, the exposed cake surfaces will dry out quickly in the refrigerator (especially low fat cakes).

The cakes which are completely encased in icing also freeze fairly well - again, the icing minimizes moisture loss. When freezing, be sure the cake is completely cool and cover the cake well.

GARNISHES

TROUBLESHOOTING

If you cakes come out too gooey and dense, check on the following:

- baking powder should be fresh and not have been exposed to humidity for a long time - it is best to use double acting baking powder (most are these days) - baking powder spoiled by humidity will not have the rising power, and will not work as well.

- the oven temperature should be accurate with the oven dial - if the oven temperature was lower than the dial says (maybe your oven thermostat is not correct, so it thinks it is at 375, but actually it might be at 325), then cakes will bake slower than they should, and the results will not be as good.

- the oven should be pre-heated.

- make sure the cakes bake long enough - test to be sure the cakes are finished: the cakes should slightly pull away from the sides of the pan, and a toothpick inserted into the cake should come out fairly clean (not wet with batter clinging to it).

- do not use brown rice syrup in the cake batter because it is notorious for making heavy cakes.

- do not use sweet brown rice flour - it makes cakes dense and gooey - use regular brown rice flour (the kind make from short grain brown rice, and not from sweet brown rice).

- if using tapioca flour, do not make it from Minute Tapioca - use only tapioca flour or starch pre-ground in a bag, or by grinding old fashion pearl tapioca_

Per serving: o Calories; og Fat (o% calories from fat); og Protein; og Carbohydrate; omg Cholesterol; omg Sodium

02-Amaretto-Peach Upside Down Chocolate Cake

Makes 2o servings.

Preparation Time: 1 hour, 1o minutes

Serving Ideas: Serve with "1o-Macadamia Nut Cream" (see recipe).

Amount Per Serving

% Daily Value*

Total Fat 15.3g 24%

Saturated Fat 6.1g 3o%

Cholesterol omg o%

Sodium 144mg 6%

Carbohydrate 62.2g 21%

Dietary Fiber 3.8g 15%

Protein 4.8g 1o%

Vitamin A o.4%

Vitamin C 4-4%

Calcium 12.2%

Iron 15.1%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,ooo calorie diet.

Calories Calories from fat

- An easy way to make tapioca flour is by grinding old fashion pearl tapioca in a coffee grinder (see the "Glossary of Ingredients" for more information on making or buying tapioca flour).

- Refer to the "Cake Notes" at the front of this chapter for information about making cakes (including the methods that can be used to make a cake more "decadent", and other methods to make a cake lower in fat)._

AMARETTO-PEACH TOPPING/FILLING 2 tablespoons walnut oil, refined 2 tablespoons amaretto

2 tablespoons light agave nectar syrup, (or maple syrup)

1/4 cup brown rice syrup 1/4 cup sucanat sugar (or granulated sugar) 2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 pound fresh peaches, sliced into crescent (about 4 large peaches)

CAKE

2 1/2 cups brown rice flour, (or spelt flour) 1/2 cup whole-grain teff flour, (or spelt flour) 4 tablespoons tapioca flour

2 tablespoons sesame seeds, ground 1 1/4 cups cocoa, (unsweetened) 3/4 teaspoon sea salt

1 tablespoons baking powder, (double acting)

1/2 cup walnut oil, refined, (or canola oil) 4 tablespoons applesauce, unsweetened (or could blend up about 1/3 of an apple) 1 3/4 cups maple syrup 1/2 cup sucanat sugar (or granulated sugar) 1 1/2 tablespoons vanilla extract 14 ounces coconut milk, (or water) 1/4 cup amaretto 3/4 cup water

GARNISH

1o servings o3-Chocolate Icing (this is another recipe in this cookbook) 1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted, glazed 1 teaspoon citrus zest, in long, thin strips (from half of a citrus fruit)

AMARETTO-PEACH TOPPING/FILLING

In a saucepan over medium heat, add walnut oil, amaretto, light agave nectar syrup, brown rice syrup, and lemon juice. Mix together and heat for about 3 minutes. Add sliced peaches, and coat peaches with mixture. Heat 1 minute and remove from heat.

Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees F (19o degrees C). Oil two 1o inch round spring form pans (it is also possible to use one 9 inch by 13 inch pan). Put parchment paper in the bottom of the pans, and oil again. For more information about pans and about the use of parchment paper for extremely easy cake turn out, refer to the Cake Pan/ Parchment Paper discussion in the "Cake Notes" at the beginning of this chapter.

Lay out one layer of peach slices in the bottom of one of the pans on top of the parchment paper. This should take about half of the peaches mixture; the other half is for use as the filling between the two cake layers (see below in the GARNISH instructions). Do not pour any of the liquid/sauce from the peach mixture over the peaches; this can be used later in garnishing and serving the cake. Set aside all remaining peach slices and any liquid/sauce in the pan.

CAKE

Sift dry ingredients together. Combine liquids, then stir into the flour mixture. Pour half of the mixture into the pan with peach topping, and the other half into the other prepared cake pan.

Bake for 3o-4o minutes (longer if using one 9 inch by 13 inch pan). Test to be sure the cakes are finished: the cakes should slightly pull away from the sides of the pan, and a toothpick inserted into the cake should come out fairly clean (not wet with batter clinging to it). Also be careful not to overbake the cakes because they can become too dry and dense in this case.

GARNISH

When making a layered cake (using 2 identical sized pans), after the cakes have cooled, place the bottom layer of the cake on a serving plate (the one that does not have the peach topping).

Take the remaining peach slices from the beginning of this recipe, and chop the peach slices into smaller pieces, and then spread this filling over the top of the first cake layer. (There will probably be some sauce left from the cooked peaches, and this is best used below.) Then place the second cake layer (the one that has the peach layer baked into it) on top of the first (so the baked in peaches are on the very top).

Ice the sides of the cake with "Chocolate Icing" (see other recipe in this book).

Take some of the reserved peach liquid/sauce from earlier in the recipe (after the peach slices were cooked), and drizzle this over the top of the cake. You don't want to drench the cake, so if you have extra left over, have it available when serving the cake. Garnish top of cake with toasted and glazed sliced almonds and the citrus zest.

VARIATIONS:

- "Amaretto-Apricot Upside Down Chocolate Cake" - Use fresh apricots in place of peaches._

Per serving: 387 Calories; i5g Fat (34% calories from fat); 5g Protein; 62g Carbohydrate; omg Cholesterol; i44mg Sodium

Preparation Time: 1 hour, 10 minutes

Serving Ideas: Serve with "10-Macadamia Nut Cream" (see recipe).

Total Fat 12.4g

Saturated Fat 5.0g Cholesterol 0mg Sodium 156mg Carbohydrate 55.9g

Dietary Fiber 4.0g Protein 5.0g

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Amount Per Serving

Calories 339

Calories from fat 106

Amount Per Serving

Calories 339

Calories from fat 106

% Daily Value*

Total Fat 12.4g

Saturated Fat 5.0g Cholesterol 0mg Sodium 156mg Carbohydrate 55.9g

Dietary Fiber 4.0g Protein 5.0g

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

- An easy way to make tapioca flour is by grinding old fashion pearl tapioca in a coffee grinder (see the "Glossary of Ingredients" for more information on making or buying tapioca flour).

- Refer to the "Cake Notes" at the front of this chapter for information about making cakes (including the methods that can be used to make a cake more "decadent", and other methods to make a cake lower in fat).

- See the "Glossary of Ingredients" for information about making ginger juice.

- See the "Glossary of Cooking Terms" for information about toasting and glazing nuts._

CAKE

1 cup brown rice flour, (or spelt flour) 1 cup millet flour, (or spelt flour) 1 1/4 cups sorghum flour, (or spelt flour) (or brown rice flour) 1/4 cup sesame seeds, ground 4 tablespoons tapioca flour

3 teaspoons ground cinnamon 3/4 teaspoon sea salt

1 tablespoon baking powder, (double acting) 1 cup dried apricots, sliced

1/2 cup walnut oil, refined, (or canola oil)

4 tablespoons applesauce, unsweetened 3/4 cup maple syrup

3/4 cup blackstrap molasses 6 tablespoons whole sugar (e.g., Rapadura) (or Sucanat sugar or granulated sugar)

2 tablespoons ginger juice, fresh (squeezed from fresh, grated ginger root) 1 1/2 tablespoons vanilla extract 14 ounces coconut milk, (or water) 1/4 cup water

FILLING

1/4 cup dried apricots, diced 1 tablespoon brown rice syrup, (or maple syrup)

GARNISH

20 servings 03-Cinnamon-Apricot Icing (this is another recipe in this cookbook) 1/2 cup dried apricots, sliced (or fresh apricot slices tossed with a tablespoon of lemon juice) 1 teaspoon citrus zest, in long, thin strips (from half a citrus fruit) 1/2 cup walnuts, toasted, glazed

Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C). Oil and flour two 10 inch round spring form pans (it is also possible to use one 9 inch by 13 inch pan). For more information about pans and about the use of parchment paper for extremely easy cake turn out, refer to the Cake Pan/Parchment Paper discussion in the "Cake Notes" at the beginning of this chapter.

CAKE

Sift dry ingredients together, and stir in apricots. Combine liquids (including the whole sugar even though it is not a liquid), then stir into the flour mixture. Pour into the prepared cake pans.

Bake for 3o-4o minutes (longer if using one 9 inch by 13 inch pan). Test to be sure the cakes are finished: the cakes should slightly pull away from the sides of the pan, and a toothpick inserted into the cake should come out fairly clean (not wet with batter clinging to it). Also be careful not to overbake the cakes because they can become too dry and dense in this case.

FILLING

When making a layered cake (using 2 identical sized pans), make the apricot layer filing by lightly cooking the diced apricots with brown rice syrup, adding tablespoons of water as needed (if the apricots are very dry, then you will need more water).

GARNISH

Once apricot layer filling has softened, and after the cakes have cooled, place the bottom layer of the cake on a serving plate (with parchment paper under the edges), and spread apricot filling (or jam if you don't have time to make the filling) over the top of this first layer. Then place the second cake on top of the first, and frost/ice the entire cake.

Garnish cake with dried or fresh apricot slices, citrus zest, and toasted, glazed walnuts (or pecans). VARIATIONS:

- "Ginger Snap Cake" - eliminate the use of all apricots (use ginger filling below).

- Use a ginger filling instead of an apricot filling (replace apricot filling with a filling made of 2 tablespoons diced crystallized ginger and 1/4 cup brown rice syrup)._

Per serving: 339 Calories; 12g Fat (31% calories from fat); 5g Protein; 56g Carbohydrate; omg Cholesterol; 156mg Sodium

Makes 15 servings.

Preparation Time: 1 hour

Serving Ideas: Serve with "io-Macadamia Nut Cream" (see recipe).

Total Fat 18.5g

Saturated Fat 5.og Cholesterol omg Sodium 113mg Carbohydrate 51.og

Dietary Fiber 5.og Protein 6.5g

Vitamin A Vitamin C Calcium Iron

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,ooo calorie diet.

Amount Per Serving

Calories 385

Calories from fat 162

Amount Per Serving

Calories 385

Calories from fat 162

% Daily Value*

Total Fat 18.5g

Saturated Fat 5.og Cholesterol omg Sodium 113mg Carbohydrate 51.og

Dietary Fiber 5.og Protein 6.5g

Vitamin A Vitamin C Calcium Iron o.3% o.7%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,ooo calorie diet.

- Refer to the "Cake Notes" at the front of this chapter for information about making cakes (applying to brownies as well) (including the methods that can be used to make a cake more "decadent", and other methods to make a cake lower in fat).

- An easy way to grind flax seeds is in a coffee grinder.

- The sweet brown rice flour in these brownies adds a little extra denseness to the brownies. Sweet brown rice flour can be ground from sweet brown rice, or purchased as flour._

DRY INGREDIENTS

3/4 cup brown rice flour, (or spelt flour) 1/4 cup sweet brown rice flour, (or spelt flour) (or brown rice flour) 3/4 cup sorghum flour

3/4 cup whole-grain amaranth flour, (or spelt flour) 1/3 cup sesame seeds, ground

1 tablespoon ground flax seed 1/8 teaspoon sea salt

2 teaspoons baking powder, (double acting) WET INGREDIENTS

1/2 cup peanut oil (unrefined or refined) (or walnut oil or canola oil) 1/2 cup peanut butter 1 1/2 cups maple syrup 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 2/3 cup water

ADDITIONS

16o grams chocolate, bittersweet, dairy-free, cut in chips

(about 1 cup when cut)

(or 1 cup dairy-free chocolate chips)

Pre-heat oven to 35o degrees F (175 degrees C). Oil and flour a 9 inch by 13 inch pan.

Combine dry ingredients together. Blend liquids, then stir into the flour mixture. Stir in chocolate. Pour into the prepared pan.

Bake for 35-4o minutes. Test to be sure the blondies are finished: the blondies should slightly pull away from the sides of the pan, and a toothpick inserted into the blondies should come out fairly clean (not wet with batter clinging to it). Also be careful not to overbake the blondies because they can become too dry and dense in this case.

VARIATIONS:

- "Macadamia Nut Butter Blondies" - use macadamia nut oil in place of peanut oil, and macadamia nut butter in place of peanut butter.

- "Almond Butter Brownies" - use almond oil in place of peanut oil, and almond butter in place of peanut butter.

Per serving: 385 Calories; 19g Fat (42% calories from fat); 7g Protein; 51g Carbohydrate; omg Cholesterol; 113mg Sodium

Preparation Time: 1 hour, 1o minutes

Serving Ideas: Serve with "1o-Macadamia Nut Cream" (see recipe).

Amount Per Serving

Calories Calories from fat

Total Fat 7.7g

Saturated Fat 1.og Cholesterol omg Sodium 15omg Carbohydrate 49.4g Dietary Fiber 3.sg Protein 3.7g

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,ooo calorie diet.

Amount Per Serving

Calories Calories from fat

Total Fat 7.7g

Saturated Fat 1.og Cholesterol omg Sodium 15omg Carbohydrate 49.4g Dietary Fiber 3.sg Protein 3.7g

174 68

% Daily Value*

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,ooo calorie diet.

- An easy way to make tapioca flour is by grinding old fashion pearl tapioca in a coffee grinder (see the "Glossary of Ingredients" for more information on making or buying tapioca flour).

- Refer to the "Cake Notes" at the front of this chapter for information about making cakes (including the methods that can be used to make a cake more "decadent", and other methods to make a cake lower in fat).

- See the "Glossary of Cooking Terms" for information about toasting and glazing nuts._

1/2 cup maple syrup

1 cup sucanat sugar (or granulated sugar)

2 cups water

1/4 cup dried mint flakes

CAKE

3 1/4 cups brown rice flour, (or spelt flour)

4 tablespoons tapioca flour

1 tablespoon ground flax seed 1 cup carob flour, (carob powder) 3/4 teaspoon sea salt

1 tablespoon baking powder, (double acting)

1/2 cup walnut oil, refined, (or canola oil) 4 tablespoons applesauce, unsweetened 1 1/2 tablespoons vanilla extract

GARNISH

2o servings o3-Mint Icing (this is another recipe in this cookbook) 1 tablespoon fresh mint leaves 1/4 cup carob chips, dairy-free 1/2 cup pecan halves, toasted, glazed (glaze with maple syrup and mint extract)

Add maple syrup, sucanat and water to a sauce pan. Wrap dried mint leaves in a cheese cloth or put the leaves into a tea infuser (or more than one if all the leaves do not fit into one) (or just use mint tea bags). Add mint to maple syrup and water. Cover, bring to a boil, lower heat, and simmer for about 3o-4o minutes. Let cool. Remove mint and remeasure the liquid. Add water so liquid amounts to 3 cups.

While mint is simmering, sift dry ingredients together.

CAKE

Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees F (19o degrees C). Oil and flour two 1o inch round spring form pans (it is also possible to use one 9 inch by 13 inch pan). For more information about pans and about the use of parchment paper for extremely easy cake turn out, refer to the Cake Pan/Parchment Paper discussion in the "Cake Notes" at the beginning of this chapter.

Once mint mixture is prepared and somewhat cooled, mix the oil, applesauce, and extract into the mint mixture. Stir the liquid mixture into the flour mixture. Pour into the prepared cake pans.

Bake for 3o-4o minutes (longer if using one 9 inch by 13 inch pan). Test to be sure the cakes are finished: the cakes should slightly pull away from the sides of the pan, and a toothpick inserted into the cake should come out fairly clean (not wet with batter clinging to it). Also be careful not to overbake the cakes because they can become too

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