What was the Aquazyme process

The Aquazyme process was a breadmaking process introduced in 1971. The process was based on a proprietary preparation called 'Aquazyme', available from Ch. Goldrei, Fouchard & Son Ltd (Liverpool), and added as a delayed ingredient during mixing. The main features of the process were as follows:

• The use of a proprietary product Aquazyme at the rate of 4 oz/gal (about 25 g/l) of water.

• Two stage mixing, each stage of equal length, total dough mixing time in minutes equal to the water absorption of the flour expressed in gallons/sack.

• The addition of the salt at the rate of 4 oz/gal of water and Aquazyme at the beginning of the second stage.

• The use of yeast at the rate of 8 oz/gal (about 20 g/l) of water, and a dough temperature of 27 °C (80 °F).

• A bulk resting of the dough after mixing for 10 minutes.

Example recipe:

lb

kg

Flour

280

100

Yeast

8%

0.20

Water

170

60.7

Fat

2

0.04

Aquazyme

4/

0.09

Salt

4/

0.09

The flour, yeast, fat and water are mixed for half the total mixing time (8% min in the example recipe) and the mixing halted while the salt and Aquazyme are added. The mixing is then completed.

A similar system introduced by the London Oil Corporation in 1966 was the Camberzyme Process (Collins et al., 1968). To our knowledge neither process is available today.

Reference

COLLINS, T.H., OVERTON, M.J., REDMAN, B.I., ROBERTS, J.A., SMITH, M.J. and CHAMBERLAIN, N. (1968) A summary of breadmaking processes with an Appendix: Mechanisms of dough formation and development. FMBRA Report No. 13, CCFRA, Chipping Campden, UK.

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