Why does the chocolate coating on our marshmallow teacakes crack during storage How can the problem be solved

The cause of this problem is easy to explain but rather more difficult to eradicate. A marshmallow is a composite product made up of biscuit, marshmallow topping and chocolate coating. Each of these components has a different ERH or water activity. Moisture will move from one component to another, driven mainly by the relative differences in water activity between components. Biscuits have a low ERH and will readily absorb moisture from the atmosphere and become soft. When marshmallow is...

Why do we get a less regular lift in our puff pastry when we use the Scotch method compared with the English or French

The so-called Scotch method of producing puff pastry differs fundamentally from the English or French in that the laminating fat is added at the dough-making stage rather than later in the process. To achieve this the laminating fat is usually cut into small cubes, with sides of about 20 mm, and added to the mixing bowl along with the other ingredients. After mixing, the paste will be sheeted and laminated in a similar manner to paste prepared by the other two methods. Telloke (1991) used light...

What are bread improvers and why are they used

The term 'bread improver' is used to embrace a wide range of materials that can be added to wheat flour and dough in order to improve some aspect of dough behaviour and final bread quality. The use of the term is common and most often applied to the addition of several ingredients at low levels blended with a 'carrier', a material that may or may not have functional properties but that aids dispersion and provides a more conveniently handled composite material. The formulation of bread...

Our chocolatecoated wafer biscuits are prone to cracking

Why does this happen and how can we avoid the problem 198 11.5 We are experiencing intermittent problems with gluten formation in our wafer batter. What causes this problem . . 199 11.6 A batch of our biscuits containing oatmeal has developed a 'soapy' after-taste which makes them unpalatable. Why is this 11.7 How do biscuits and crackers get broken during storage, even if they are not disturbed 201 11.8 We are making a ginger crunch cookie. Why do we experience variations in size 202 11.9 When...

We are experiencing intermittent problems with gluten formation in our wafer batter What causes this problem

Gluten development is undesirable in wafer batters because it can lead to blockages in pipes or nozzles of batter distribution systems. This can lead to uneven distribution of batter on the plates and the incomplete formation of wafer sheets. Gluten formation depends on three main factors the presence of protein in the flour, the hydration of that protein from the addition of water and the input of energy during mixing. In batter systems the ratio of water to flour solids is usually high enough...

How do we convert a plain sponge recipe to a chocolate form

The use of the term ' chocolate' to describe a cake varies a little around the world and is often regulated in some way. For example, in the UK chocolate can be used as a cake descriptor only if the final product contains not less than 3 dry, non-fat cocoa solids (LAJAC, 1963). This is usually achieved through the addition of cocoa powder and when calculating the level to use in a recipe allowance must be made for variations in moisture (usually around 5 ) and fat (commonly between 10 and 20 )....

Cauvain Sponge Cake Technology

CAUVAIN, S.P. and YOUNG, L.S. (2000) Bakery Food Manufacture and Quality Water control and effects, Blackwell Science, Oxford, UK. TELLOKE, G.W. (1984) The mixing of cake batters. FMBRA Report No. 114, CCFRA, Chipping Campden, UK. 3.7 We are making 'all-butter' cakes but find that after baking they lack volume and have a firm eating character. Why is this and is there any way to improve the cake quality Butter is often chosen in cakemaking because of its quality attributes related to flavour...

Contents

Preface 1 Problem solving - a guide 1.1 How to problem solve 1.2 The record 1.3 The analysis 1.4 Modelling techniques 1.5 The information sources 1.6 Some key ingredient and process factors affecting product quality 1.7 Conclusions 1.8 References 2 Flours 2.1 What effects will variations in flour protein content have on baked product quality How is the property measured 18 2.2 There are many references to protein and gluten quality in the technical literature. How important are these properties...

Our chocolatecoated wafer biscuits are prone to cracking Why does this happen and how can we avoid the problem

The most likely cause of your problem is the absorption of water by the wafer and its subsequent expansion. We suggest that you look closely at the quality of your enrobing practices because any uncoated areas or even pin-prick holes in the coating provide access points for water from the atmosphere. The moisture content of wafers is very low in order that they will have a crisp eating quality. The ERH of the wafer is also very low and much lower than the relative humidity of most atmospheric...

What are the most important factors that control the volume of choux paste products

When choux paste is being baked any air that has been beaten into the paste will expand and the water will be converted to steam. The expanded air and steam try to escape but to a large extent are prevented from doing so because both are trapped and retained by the gluten matrix and uncoagulated film of egg albumen. The egg albumen (protein) is extensible and will be inflated and distended by the internal pressures of the gases - air and steam. Expansion of the paste only ceases when the egg...

Our scones are made from frozen dough but frequently lack volume We also find that the crumb colour is rather brown How

Scones depend on chemical raising agents for their volume. Once the raising agents come into contact with water the chemical reaction to produce carbon dioxide begins. In the production of a frozen scone dough there is a loss in this aeration capacity because of the onset of the aeration reaction and subsequently a loss in volume in the baked product. To overcome the loss of aeration, a change to a slower-acting acid will help, e.g. sodium acid pyrophosphate (SAPP) or sodium acid aluminium...

What is chlorinated flour and how is it used

The treatment of flour with chlorine gas was first identified in the 1920s and was used for the modification of the cakemaking properties of flours for many years in the UK, the USA, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and many other countries. The use of chlorination for cake flour treatment was withdrawn from the UK in 2000 The Miscellaneous Food Additive Amendment Regulations, 1999 . It remains permitted in many other countries. Chlorine treatment of flour permits the raising of recipe...